Mobile sync process to dedicated URL

Mobile sync process to dedicated URL

  

Is there a way to redirect mobile synchronization process to a dedicated URL?  Other than consuming a service, that is.


Thanks,

Daniel Brooks

Solution

Hi Daniel,

You can exchange data (sync) with any URL via a webservice (SOAP/REST) or with some extra work also directly via an URL via HTTP GET/POST, but I'm a bit confused why you want to do it the hard way.

Can you be more clear on what you need exactly and why you need this?

Kind regards,

Remco Dekkinga

Solution

Remco Dekkinga wrote:

Hi Daniel,

You can exchange data (sync) with any URL via a webservice (SOAP/REST) or with some extra work also directly via an URL via HTTP GET/POST, but I'm a bit confused why you want to do it the hard way.

Can you be more clear on what you need exactly and why you need this?

Kind regards,

Remco Dekkinga


Our IT group suggested this, but we've decided against it.

Thank you.

Hi Daniël,

Can you share the reasons why you should decide against those solutions? This might help others when making decisions on this subject. 

Kind regards,

Remco Dekkinga

Remco Dekkinga wrote:

Hi Daniël,

Can you share the reasons why you should decide against those solutions? This might help others when making decisions on this subject. 

Kind regards,

Remco Dekkinga

We have the need to use a reverse proxy (although I am unsure, at the moment, how to configure Outsystems to point to an external URL).  We will need to communicate to an external resource which then the reverse proxy rewrites that URL to an internal business resource.

The train of thought was, the application URL would serve web files, while the sync process would use a separate, dedicated URL for pulling possible sensitive application data.

Although, since we will have the entire site on SSL, and that the sync process is reaching out to the same resource that the web files are requested from, a separate, dedicated URL--whether that was some obscure config that we could set, a REST/SOAP service, or a home-baked, custom HTTP service--it didn't make sense considering the extra effort.