SQL Server 2008 midnight memory ram on killing spree

SQL Server 2008 midnight memory ram on killing spree

  
Hi guys,

This is not directly related to Outsystems but is related with one of the supported databases.

In our development environment, our machine freezes 30min every midnight. I've tried to check what's going on and I think that is SQL Server 2008 fault. And why?

Because when I access the machine, it states that 96% of memory ram is being used and SQLServer.exe (the process) is occupying 80Mb (odd!). But when I kill the process, the memory ram used goes down to 21%. Our machine has 8gb RAM and when we try to remote, at midnight, it's almost impossible because it's really struggling. After half hour, things return to normal.

I've checked if there was a Outsystems timer running that hour (there is but nothing special), I've checked SQL Server 2008 jobs and none is scheduled for that hour. I'm really clueless!

Does anyone had this problem too?

Thanks
Hello Carlos,

I would say that it is defnitly that Timer that is causing that trouble. Isn't there a query that is strugglying to finish?

Does the timers ends successfully?

Pedro
The only one that I see that struggles is the CleanRawData from LifeTime. But I don't know what it does (I imagine it deletes records used by lifetime)...
I'm not 100% sure but I think that ClearRawData is from the Lifetime's Performance Monitor.

Does the timer ends without success?
I've checked and that's the machine killer :)

I don't know what it does but never finishes.
Good stuff :) At least it is identified!

I would suggest that you open a support ticket so that you get he best help you can get!

Nevertheless, and again I'm not 100% sure, but that timers cleans old data from the Performance Monitor. If it is not working properly, it is endeed a case for support.

Cheers!
Pedro
Thank you very much Pedro! :) 
Welcome!
A lot of folks get worried when they see SQL Server taking up 95% of the RAM on the machine, that's normal. RAM use on SQL Server is supposed to be near 100%. By default, it takes up every byte of RAM on the machine, leaving just enough for the OS to do its job.

J.Ja